Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP

Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP Polizeipistole! A rare NSKK Walther PP

For our first post in this week’s ‘Polizeipistole!’ series we have chosen a Walther PP that was manufactured in the Zella-Mehlis factory in 1934 and specially inscribed for issue to the NSKK. This is one of the hardest PP pistols to find, especially a first issue with the 90-degree safety. Read on for another LSB journey in firearms history…

The Carl Walther family concern had been founded in 1886 by Carl, who died in 1915, leaving the company to be run by his sons. Walther had been successful in marketing pocket pistols, starting with the Model 1 in 1910, right up to the Model 9 in 1921. All were in 6.35mm Br calibre, except for the Model 3 and Model 4, which were in 7.65mm Br, and the Model 6, which was in 9mm Parabellum. The Model 8 had novel features and particularly good looks, which immediately made it a success. It was also the design which led to the next step in Walther’s evolution as a foremost producer of fine pistols.

In the late 1920s, Walther were working on a new pistol designed on the same lines as the Model 8, but in 7.65mm Br. Their objective was to sell it to the Police and paramilitary forces. Hence, they christened it the ‘Polizei Pistole’, or ‘PP’. The elegant new pistol was launched in 1929 in 7.65mm Br. Three more calibers were eventually introduced for this model: .22LR, the short-lived 6.35mm Br and the 9x17mm (‘9mm Kurz’). It was to prove a huge success, such that by the end of the war the PP had been used not only by the German Police but also the Wehrmacht, various national organisations as well as the NSDAP (Nazi Party) and many of its paramilitary formations, such as the SA, SS and NSKK. It was also exported to a number of countries.

The ‘Nationalsozialistisches Kraftfahrkorps’ (National Socialist Motor Corps), or NSKK, was a paramilitary organization forming part of the ‘Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei’ (National-Socialist German Workers Party), or NSDAP. The NSKK served to train members in the operation and maintenance of moto vehicles as well as to transport officials of the NSDAP and its various organisations. With the construction of the first German Autobahn, the NSKK’s role also included roadside assistance services on the same lines as that offered by the AA. When WWII broke out, the highly trained NSKK personnel were seconded to military transport units. Following the fall of France, a special NSKK section was set up for Frenchmen. By 1943, almost the entire NSKK complement was on active service with either the Wehrmacht or the Waffen SS. Nevertheless, the NSKK remained one of the smallest, yet highly specialised, paramilitary forces of the NSDAP.

Starting in 1934, the NSKK began procuring 7.65mm Br PP pistols from Carl Walther. Around 3,500 were delivered by 1939. These were marked with the ‘crown/N’ Nitro proof. A further circa 600 pistols were delivered by 1941. These were marked with the new ‘eagle/N’ Nitro proof. The lowest know serial number for NSKK PP pistols in the first delivery of 1934 is ‘812990’. We estimate that only around the first 100-150 pistols had the 90-degree safety. The Walther inscription on the left side of the slide was condensed and moved towards the front to allow sufficient space for the NSKK insignia. This was the only NSDAP organisation, other than the RZM (the NSDAP’s quartermaster stores), to have its insignia featured on the Walther PP.

The example that we are presenting today is an extremely rare early 90-degree safety variant from the first batch of pistols delivered to the NSKK in 1934. It is the next lowest serial number after the one recorded and only four numbers away from it. The pistol has matching-numbered components and retains much of its original high-gloss blued finish, which shows wear commensurate with age.

Today’s post is also featured on our Facebook Page.

If you wish to own this rare and interesting firearm, please send us a private message or phone us on 99471091. It will be reserved for the first client who pays a deposit by Mobile or Online bank transfer. Police applications will be filled in after we receive the deposit and a scan/photo of the client's 2020 Collector Licence A Special.

While our photos are as detailed as possible and do not hide any flaws, you have the option of examining the firearm physically, by appointment. Do not take any risks with overseas online auctions when you have the chance of knowing what you are buying. LSB’s knowledge and experience in historical firearms assures you of a good investment. We offer a lifetime guarantee on the genuineness of the pieces in our vast inventory so that you may buy in full confidence.

We take great pleasure in bringing you these daily snippets of firearms history and we hope that you enjoy reading them


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